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Tag: PCF8574

Android Things IO Port Driver Update

In a previous post I signed off with questions about the functionality of the pfc8574. What is all this ‘quasi-bidirectional’ stuff in the data sheet about? It prevented me from implementing a getPin() method in my Android Things things-drivers library. I didn’t know what would happen when I set a pin value making it an output, then read the pin state. Would it be the value I wrote, or the pin state based on the electrical biasing of the pin.

Now that I have the pcf8574 test jig I can see what actually happens when I set pcf8574 pins high or low, and Raspberry Pi pins high or low. I can make a truth table of pin states to see if it would be OK to implement the readPin() method that’s missing from the driver.

The Hardware

The hardware for this experiment is the pcf8574 test jig setup that I used in the test jig experiment.

The PCF8574 Test Jig

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Android Things Driver Testing

So you’ve written your first device driver for Android Things. You think it does what it’s supposed to. I mean, it seems to work. Hardware can be complicated. How can you be sure you’ve implemented your driver correctly? Are you sure you’ve understood the device’s data sheet? How do you test all of your driver features? How can you prove it’s working properly?

One thing you can do to verify your driver works correctly is to make a test jig. A test jig is a physical representation of the device your driver is written for. It may be an actual device or as close an approximation as you can find or make. The closer it is to the real thing the better.

Test jigs come in all shapes and sizes, and all levels of completeness. The test jig allows you to verify your driver on actual hardware. It can also make the development and testing of your library easier, saving you a lot of development time. Sparkfun have a tutorial on using pogopins to make test jigs. It’s well worth the time to read if you want to see production testing in action.

 

PCF8574 Test Jig

Making a driver test jig

I’m going to make a test jig for my pcf8574 driver. I’ll use a Raspberry Pi with an expansion board containing a pcf8574. I’ll create a test application that uses the driver to exercise the hardware and I’ll use the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO pins to confirm the driver does what I think it does. The concepts are the same as those described in the Sparkfun article, but I won’t go as far as making a dedicated PCB. The test jig is part of a two pronged strategy to device driver testing: unit tests verify that the logic of my driver is correct, and the test jig verifies that my driver manipulates the physical world as expected.

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Adding Buttons to Android Things

In this experiment I’m going to add buttons to Android Things using the user space input driver extension mechanism provided by the platform. I’ll be using momentary push buttons connected to a Raspberry Pi running the Android Things preview image. The buttons will be connected via an I2C IO port, the PCF8574. I’ll use one GPIO on the Raspberry Pi as an ‘interrupt’ line to detect a button press, then I’ll read the button states and report button presses to the framework as input events.

The setup with buttons

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I2C with Android Things (Part 2)

In the first part of this series we set up some hardware to drive an LCD character display with the Raspberry Pi running the preview image of Android Things. In this part we will setup the project in Android Studio, import the driver library and write a message to the display.

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I2C with Android Things (Part 1)

Welcome to the first part in a two part series about using an LCD Character display with Android Things. In this part we’ll collect, partially explain, and wire together the hardware. In the next part we’ll setup the project in Android Studio and write some clever messages to the display.

The Android things I2C API enables you to communicate with I2C devices, such as the PCF8574, using java in an Android project. The PCF8574 is a port expander that lets you connect to peripherals over a relatively high speed serial bus to a controller. This reduces the wire count and pin usage. Common usage includes interfaces to buttons, keypads and displays. We will use the PCF8574 to connect a Raspberry Pi to an LCD Character display.

 

Character LCD driven by Android Things

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